Takin’ It to the Streets: Pilgrimage in East Lansing

By Amy DeRogatis

Last Sunday, April 2, 2017, I participated in an interfaith pilgrimage through the streets of East Lansing. To prepare for the event, I spent a few days reading and thinking about pilgrimage. Why do people take pilgrimages? What do they hope to accomplish? Where are they seeking to go? And, significantly for this project, what are the sounds that I might expect to hear while on a pilgrimage?

Building Community Relationships

Text by Caroline Toy
Recordings, editing, and photographs by Lauren Pond

At many sites and events where ARSP researchers record, we try to make ourselves barely noticeable to the community. While we get permission to record and answer questions openly, it’s not unusual for us to document a service or festival understanding that our recordings are only an auditory snapshot, a single, ephemeral slice of religious life at a particular place and time.

Sound as a Point of Contact

Recordings, photographs, and text by Lauren Pond and Isaac Weiner Audio editing by Lauren Pond

One recurring motif to which the ARSP team has been attuned is how different sounds–including those deemed religious and those deemed secular–intersect and overlap in particular social contexts. We are interested in what it sounds like when religion spills outside of the institutional boundaries meant to contain it and, conversely, how the ambient sonic qualities of a given social situation shape the experience of religious life. In these moments, sound becomes a point of contact, mediating interactions among diverse religious communities, between religion and its broader social environment, and between human practice and the natural world. The following clips offer a few examples of what we have found.

1. Isha prayer at the Noor Islamic Cultural Center

Lauren Pond wins First Book Prize!

Congratulations to ARSP multimedia content producer Lauren Pond, who won the 2016 Duke University Center for Documentary Studies/Honickman First Book Prize in Photography for her color series, Test of Faith. Her photography project, in progress since 2011, documents a family of Pentecostal serpent handlers in West Virginia. In fall 2017, Lauren’s photographs and narrative essay will be published in a book by CDS and Duke University Press.

To read more about Lauren’s project, read an interview with her here or check out her professional website.

Recording the Human Side of Ceremony

By Bree Gannon

The Imam prays. A baby cries. This is the human in ceremony, the spontaneous in orchestration.

I made this audio clip from material I recorded at the Muslim celebration of Eid-Al-Fitr, the end of fasting for the month of Ramadan. It was my first time attending an Islamic service. As I observed, I noticed the children: They climbed in their parents’ laps, exchanged small gifts, ran around, and talked with each other. Having grown up in a religious tradition where children were tucked away in nurseries and church basements, this was a novel experience for me.

News from the Michigan State University Research Team

The Michigan State University research team met with Professor Amy DeRogatis (co-director of the ARSP) on Friday, January 13, 2017, to map out its work for the spring semester. Our team includes five undergraduate researchers and project manager Bree Gannon, a PhD student in WRAC.

This spring, our team plans to record religious sounds related to food. During our brainstorming session, we discussed recording some of the following sites and activities to get us started: Lenten fish fries, faith-based soup kitchens, Friday night hot dog ministry on Grand River Avenue (we are looking at you, Christopher!), langars, coffee hours after a church services, Shabbat meals, the giving and receiving of prasad, Greek Orthodox Easter feasts, and a halal butcher shop.

Sounds of the Holiday Season

Recordings by J. Caroline Toy, Isaac Weiner, and Lauren Pond
Audio editing by Lauren Pond
Photographs by Lauren Pond and Isaac Weiner

Religion is often portrayed as a discrete entity – as something that’s confined within the four walls of a church, mosque, temple, synagogue, or the like. Our current work on the American Religious Sounds Project begins to challenge these assumptions. Through our field recordings and essays, we have started to explore how religious sound can seep out of its traditional confines and interact with the surrounding sonic environment – sometimes in a confrontational manner, and sometimes in a more symbiotic one. We’re examining how sound can serve as a point of contact between different faiths, between religious and secular spheres, and among religious followers themselves.

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