Demonstrations in Cleveland during the 2016 Republican National Convention

Safe and Productive Field Research

This summer and fall, the ARSP staff have been working on revising the materials we provide to coordinators at sites that are joining the project, including our manual of best practices. The manual covers everything from the project philosophy to recording technology to strategies for introducing undergraduates to ethnography via sound. Alongside that, we’ve also given a lot of thought to the ethical implications of our work. One practical ethical concern we’ve been thinking about lately is how to ensure that our students have productive, safe learning experiences in the field. In this blog post, ARSP Project Coordinator Alison Furlong and Graduate Project Manager Caroline Toy talk about keeping fieldworkers safe.

Alison: Obviously, there’s a difference between keeping students safe and becoming paranoid or over-protective.

Interview with ARSP affiliate Katie Graber

In July, ARSP affiliate Dr. Katie Graber, a Lecturer in Musicology at the Ohio State University School of Music, published a digital exhibit about her research on diversity within the Mennonite Church USA and Mennonite Church Canada. We interview Dr. Graber about her work, which focuses on song as a vehicle for understanding cultural, lingustic and musical variations within different Mennonite congregations across North America. 

Kate Topham

Kate Topham joins ARSP as Digital Archivist

We are delighted to announce that, effective June 26, Kate Topham will be joining the American Religious Sounds Project in the role of Digital Archivist! Kate is uniquely qualified for this position, having just graduated from the University of Michigan’s School of Information with a MSI in Digital Curation and Archives and Records Management. Past projects include the “Michigan Latin Archive,” a digital exhibition of materials on Latin education at Michigan, and  “Music Time in Africa,” a tool to visualize data from recordings of the Music Time in Africa radio program, including interactive map and word cloud visualizations. Besides her 50% appointment with ARSP, she will be an Academic Specialist in DH@MSU, which includes faculty, staff, and students across the university and is housed in the College of Arts and Letters.

ARSP featured in Tricycle

Tricycle, the leading independent journal of Buddhism in the West, has featured the work of the American Religious Sounds Project in a May 16 article by Sheila Burt. 

ARSP Welcomes New Project Manager!



The American Religious Sounds Project is thrilled to announce that Alison Furlong will join our team as Project Manager! Alison graduated with a Ph.D. from the ethnomusicology program of the Ohio State University School of Music in 2015. Her dissertation dealt with churches as alternative spaces of music-making in the former East Germany, and she has presented her work at meetings of the American Folklore Society, German Studies Association, American Musicological Society, and Society for Ethnomusicology. In 2016, she published an article entitled “Politics, Faith, and the East German Blues” in Colloquia Germanica. Prior to graduate study, she worked for many years in the tech industry.

ARSP at the AAR

The ARSP team recently traveled to Denver, Colorado, for the American Academy of Religion (AAR) Annual Meeting, held this year at the Colorado Convention Center. Each November, the AAR conference brings together thousands of scholars, journalists, artists, publishers, and others from across the nation for several days of panel discussions, exhibits, and events.

ARSP Presentation at Art Institute of Chicago

In September, ARSP co-directors Isaac Weiner and Amy DeRogatis participated in a public conversation with artist James Webb at the opening of his sound exhibit “Prayer” at the Art Institute of Chicago. 

Learning to Hear in Arch City Religion

By Rachel McBride Lindsey
Saint Louis University

What do we gain as researchers by listening for religion in the city? This was one of the questions I posed to students in my second-year elective course, “Arch City Religion: Religious Life and Practice in St. Louis,” last spring.

Pages